A Summer For Heroes by Nicolas Trudgian

A SUMMER FOR HEROES
By 
Nicolas Trudgian

The white cliffs of the south east coast of England, standing defiantly in the face of would-be invaders, are now 
synonymous with the pivotal conflict in the summer of 1940, the Battle of Britain, the Royal Air Force's finest hour.
Spitfire pilots of No.65 Squadron, heading home to re-arm and refuel, display the exuberance of youth as they swoop low in celebration over a downed Bf109. Above them, a squadron of Hurricanes climbs out to intercept raiders above
the Channel where the swirling paths of duelling aircraft are traced in vapour, high in the summer sky.

A message from the patron of The Battle of Britain Memorial Trust
HRH Prince Michael of Kent GCVO

Prince Michael of KentLetter from Prince Michael of Kent


THE MEMORIAL

The National Memorial to the Battle of Britain stands appropriately on the high white cliffs of
Kent, at Capel-le-Ferne. Unveiled by Her Late Majesty Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother
in 1993, the centrepiece stone memorial by the sculptor Harry Gray takes the form of a
seated airman, looking out over the English  Channel. It commemorates the airmen
Winston Churchill described as 'The Few', those in the forefront of the defence of Britain
in the pivotal summer of 1940.

For the first time in almost 900 years British shores were about to be invaded and it fell to the
Royal Air Force to keep the enemy at bay in a very close run battle. It is perhaps surprising then
that a further 50 years were to pass before any worthy memorial was established to honour those
who fought so bravely. That we now have one is thanks to the sadly missed Wing Commander
Geoffrey Page, himself one of 'The Few', who founded the Battle of Britain Memorial Trust
and provided the inspiration to make a permanent memorial a reality.

Statue

The centrepiece of the memorial, a pilot sits surrounded by
the crests of all the squadrons that participated in the Battle of Britain.
Illustration by Nicolas Trudgian

In the early days of the memorial the Beaverbrook family provided funds for a wall on which are
Winston Churchill's words, ''Never in the field of human conflict has so much been owed by so many
to so few''. Nearby there is the black granite Christopher Foxley-Norris Memorial Wall on which
are listed the names of almost 3,000 Allied airmen who participated in the Battle. Visitors can also 
view two full-scale replicas of a Hurricane and Spitfire, the fighters that saved the day. Fittingly, the
Hurricane is painted in the colours of Geoffrey Page's own aircraft in which he was shot down and
badly burned, a reminder that for many who survived that summer the scars of war remained.

The site at Capel-le-Ferne attracts visitors from all over the world. It is a source of comfort to the
relatives of those who fell in the Battle or who have passed away since and the 'Hunting Lodge'
visitor centre is of essential educational value to the younger generations. Despite this, it receives
no funding from Government nor other official sources. The costs of maintenance of the structures,
facilities and grounds amounts to at least £70,000 per year and, in addition, the Memorial Trust
is seeking to raise £500,000 in order to expand the 'Hunting Lodge' which will further increase
the educational benefits to the visitor.


THE BATTLE OF BRITAIN
JULY 10TH TO OCTOBER 31ST 1940

By the beginning of June 1940 Britain stood alone. Hitler's armies had stormed across Europe, Allied
troops had been evacuated from the beaches at Dunkirk and France was in Nazi hands. With the world
watching, Hitler now turned his attention to Britain, the last bastion of freedom and detailed plans were
drawn up for an invasion, code-named 'Operation Sea Lion'.

Before any German vessels could set sail, the Nazis needed total air supremacy and that required the
destruction of the Royal Air Force. In charge of RAF Fighter Command was Air Chief Marshal
Sir Hugh Dowding. He was an astute man who had already managed to withdraw precious aircraft from
France before they were lost and sought to increase their number as fast as production would allow,
in preparation for the battle which he knew would come.

Dowding had also championed the installation of the pioneering science of Range Direction Finding,
later to be called Radar. This enabled observers to detect enemy aerial formations and, by plotting their
height and direction, allowed RAF fighters to intercept with great efficiency.

Radar Masts

Radar Installation

With Luftwaffe units now in place along the coast of northern France, their commander, Hermann
Göring, ordered the first phase of what would later be known to the world as the Battle of Britain. On
the 10th July they began by attacking shipping and port installations along the south coast of England.
Furious combat took place as RAF fighters put up far greater resistance than the Germans expected.
Throughout July and into August wave after wave of Luftwaffe formations attacked targets throughout
the southern counties and each time had to face the most determined opposition.

In an attempt to conquer this great frustration, the Germans changed tactics and tried to knock out the
RAF's aerodromes and radar stations. Severe damage was inflicted on many airfields and particularly at
the most important such as Biggin Hill, Hornchurch, Kenley and North Weald. However, despite the
upheaval and heavy casualties, every aerodrome was somehow kept operational.

RAF Bentley Priory

RAF Bentley Priory

In what was certainly a tactical mistake, the Germans turned their attention away from the airfields and 
on the 7th September 1940 attacked London instead. The RAF, expecting further raids against their 
airfields, were unprepared and the Luftwaffe was able to inflict severe damage. The fires that burned 
in the East End and docks along the Thames could be seen from far and wide. German intelligence
mistakenly believed that Fighter Command was down to its last aircraft and would soon be defeated.

On Sunday the 15th September the Luftwaffe launched its largest raid against the capital. RAF
squadrons from No.11 Group, commanded by Air Vice-Marshal Keith Park, were hastily scrambled to
meet the threat. In addition, a Wing from No.12 Group, comprising some sixty aircraft led by Douglas
Bader, took off from Duxford. As the German bombers and their fighter escorts approached London
they were dismayed to be met, not by a handful of fighters, but by a vast wall of opposition. The
Luftwaffe paid a very heavy price. For the loss of 27 RAF aircraft, 56 Luftwaffe bombers and fighters
were destroyed. Although the RAF didn't know it at the time, the cost to the Luftwaffe at the hands of 
a seemingly indestructible Fighter Command forced Hitler to postpone his plans for an invasion
indefinitely.

With the coming of autumn, German attacks continued, but no longer on such a scale and mostly took
place under the cover of darkness, as the Luftwaffe began a night-bombing campaign against Britain's
towns and cities. Fighter Command had to learn new techniques of intercepting in darkness and had a
chance to reflect on a summer of supreme heroism, sacrifice and a struggle so nearly lost. The 15th of
September was such a momentous day for Britain that it will be for evermore commemorated as
Battle of Britain Day. In all, a total of 544 aircrew gave their lives during the battle for our freedom.

Defence of London by Nicolas Trudgian

Defence of London


The Clasp of the Few

‘The clasp for The Few’

Of the 3000 aircrew of Fighter
Command who earned the right to wear the 1939-45 Star, with Battle of Britain clasp, 
544 died during the Battle.  The Hurricane and Spitfire were the aircraft which bore the
brunt of the fighting, but, others, some of them multi-crewed, took part, so not all of
‘The Few’ were pilots.  As well as those from the UK, aircrew in the Battle came from a 
wide range of countries including, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, South Africa, Poland,
Czechoslovakia, France, Belgium, Ireland and the United States.

This stunning NEW limited edition print which commemorates the 
70th Anniversary of the Battle of Britain carries the original signatures of up to 50 of 'The Few'.


THE AIRCREW

Squadron Leader Percy Beake DFC
Joined the RAFVR in April 1939. After training and converting to Spitfires, he joined 64 Sqn. on the 22nd September. He served with the squadron at various stations before being posted to 92 Sqn. at Biggin Hill in June 1941.

Wing Commander Roland Beamont CBE DSO* DFC*
Joined the RAF on a short service commission in January 1939, after training and converting to 
Hurricanes he joined 87 Sqn. in France, claiming a victory on the 13th May. The Squadron was with drawn to England on the 22nd May and after a refit was posted to Exeter where he had several victories. He stayed with 87 Sqn. until June 1941 where he was posted to 79 Sqn. as a Flight Commander. His total victories were 7 confirmed.

Air Chief Marshal Sir Harry Broadhurst GCB KCB KBE CB DSO* DFC* AFC
Joining the army and being  commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant in the Royal Artillery, transferring to thereof in 1926 and posted to 11 Sqn. being sent to India. He was posted back to Britain on the 16th September 1931 were he was sent to 41 Sqn. He moved to 19 Sqn. based at Duxford on the 26th November. After several other appointments in January 1939 he took command of 111 Sqn. being awarded a DFC on the 2nd January1940. On leaving 111 Sqn he went to HQ 11 Group to command 60 Wing in France. After the withdrawal in June, Broadhurst became Station Commander at Wittering where he flew several sorties with 1 Sqn. 
His final victory tally was 13 destroyed.

Air Commodore Pete Brothers CBE DSO DFC*
He learnt to fly at 16 and joined the RAF on a short service commission in January 1936. 
After initial training he was posted to 32 Sqn. at Biggin Hill flying Gauntlets, becoming a Flight Commander in late 1938. Flying Hurricanes claiming victories over France in May, also during the Battle of Britain. Then being posted as a Flight Commander to 257 Sqn. claiming more victories. He was awarded the DFC on the 13th September. Staying with the Squadron until January 1941.  Finishing the war with 16 Victories.

Pilot Officer Norman Brown
Joining the RAF VR in August 1939, he was called up for full time service on the 1st September. After training and converting to Spitfires he was posted to 611 Sqn on the 28th September, he then moved to 41 Sqn. at Hornchurch on the 12th October. On the 1st November he overshot
Hornchurch and ended up in the barrage balloon defence of London. Striking a cable he crash landed at Dagenham. This incident was a factor for being discharged from the RAF.

Squadron Leader Peter Brown AFC
April 4th 1938 he joined the RAF, after training he was posted to 611 Sqn. at Duxford on September 21st 1939. He took part in the Dunkirk evacuations and on the 2nd June 1940 his Spitfire was damaged whilst attacking a large formation of Bf109’s, landing at Southend with a burst tyre. In September1940 he flew as part of the Duxford Wing, during this time he had 2 victories. On the 28th he was posted to Hornchurch with 41 Sqn. Having 3 victories including a Bf109 on the 20th October where he landed at West Malling to collect the German pilots life jacket as confirmation of his victory. He stayed with the Squadron until January 1942.

Squadron Leader Joe Chamberlain
Joined the RAFVR in June 1939, called up for service at the outbreak of war. After training he joined 235 Sqn. flying Blenheims. Staying with the Squadron until October 1941.

Flight Lieutenant Henry 'Harry' Clarke
Joining the RAFVR in Belfast March 1939, he made his first solo flight in July. Called up for active service on the 1st September. After initial training and converting to Spitfires he joined 74 sqn. on 10th August 1940, staying there for    only three days before being posted to 66 Sqn. Whilst there he had an amazing escape. During a practice dogfight he hit another Spitfire head-on, after the impact he managed to control the Spitfire enough to bailout, but struck the tail plane, after coming too, he found himself hanging upside down with just one leg in the harness of the parachute, scrabbling to get upright in the harness he hit the ground, his only injury was a deep cut chin.  September 11th he joined 610 Sqn.  Staying with it until December 1940.

Flight Lieutenant Jimmy Corbin
Joining the RAF VR in April 1939, he was called up for full-time service on the1st September.  After initial training and converting to Spitfires he was posted to 74 Sqn. on the 26th August 1940, and then moved to 66 Sqn. on the 29th. Being posted to 610 Sqn. on the10th September, 6 weeks later he posted back to 66 where he stayed until September 1941.

Wing Commander David Cox DFC* 
Joined the RAFVR in April 1939 and began his final training at Gatwick, called up on the 1st September. He joined 19 Sqn. flying Spitfires on the 23rd May 1940. He fought with distinction during the Battle of Britain with several victories, before being shot down on the 27th September where he was wounded. Final score was 8 victories. 

Flight Lieutenant Mike Croskell
Joining the RAFVR in June 1938, and awarded his wings in August 1939, being called up on September 1st.Converting to Hurricanes in January 1940 and being posted to 213 Sqn. He saw action over Dunkirk and had a victory on the 29th May. In August he had 3 victories before being shot down on the 15 September, he stayed with the Squadron until February 1941.

Air Marshal Sir Dennis Crowley-Milling KCB CBE DSO DFC AE
Joined the RAFVR in November 1937, called up on September 1st. After training he converted to Gladiators where he was posted to 615 Sqn. in France on the 14th May 1940. When the Squadron was withdrawn he was posted to 242 Sqn. where he saw action again over France. During the Battle of Britain he had several victories and was also damaged in combat on the 7th September where he made a false landing. His final victory score was 5 destroyed.

Flight Lieutenant Len Davies
In July 1939 he joined 608 Sqn, AuxAF as an aircraft hand. On the 24th August he was called up and re-mustered as an airman u/t pilot. On completion of training he joined 151 Sqn. at North Weald on the 15th July 1940. On 28th August following combat over the Thames he was wounded in the leg, loosing allot of blood he decided to make a crash landing at Eastchurch. Control fired a flare to alert him to the bomb craters on the airfield, he had no option but to try and land, he overturned the Hurricane in one of the craters. After convalescence he rejoined the Squadron until January 1941 where he was posted to Malta.

Flight Lieutenant David Denchfield
In May 1939 he joined the RAFVR as an Airman u/t pilot being called up on September 1st. and after training he converted to Spitfires on the 23rd September 1940 and joined 610 Sqn on the 7th October at Acklington.  He was shot down by Bf 109’s on February 2nd 1941 and became a POW.

Wing Commander Bob Doe DSO DFC*
Joined the RAF in 1939 on a short service commission. After training he joined 234 Sqn.at Leconfield on 6th November 1939. Engaged in intense air fighting during the Battle of Britain flying Spitfires and claimed multiple of victories before being posted to 238 Sqn. on the 27th September flying Hurricanes where he gained more victories, before being shot down in combat on the 10th October and bailed out after being wounded in the leg and shoulder. He was awarded the DFC on the 22nd October 1940. After convalescence he rejoined the Squadron at the end of December 1940. His final score was 15 destroyed.

Group Captain Billy Drake DSO DFC*
Joining the RAF on a short service commission in July 1936, after initial training he was posted to  1 Sqn. in Tangmere in May 1937. The Squadron went to France in September 1939 where he had multiple victories before being shot down by Bf 110’s on the 13th May, bailed out and wounded he was hospitalised before being flown back to the UK returning to operational duties with 213 Sqn. at Tangmere on the 2nd October. Three weeks later he was posted to 421 Flight as a Flight Commander claiming several more victories. His final score was 19 victories. 

Group Captain Sir Hugh Dundas CBE DSO* DFC
Joined 616 Sqn. Aux AF in May 1939, being called up for full time service on the 24th August 1939. He flew Spitfires in the defence of Dunkirk. During the Battle of Britain he saw action in July and August where he had several victories before being shot down and wounded on the 22nd August 1940. He stayed with the Squadron and had more successes before being posted in September 1941 to 610 Sqn.His total victories were 7 confirmed.

Wing Commander Tim Elkington
Entering the RAF as a Flight Cadet at Cramwell in September 1939, on completing training was posted to 1 Sqn. on the 15th July 1940 flying Hurricanes, the following day he was engaged in combat over Portsmouth where his aircraft was badly damaged. Bailing out he landed at West Wittering and admitted to a hospital at Chichester. He returned to the Squadron on October 1st where he achieved two victories he served with the Squadron until April 1941.

 Air Commodore John Ellacombe CB DFC*
Joining the RAF in 1939 on a short service commission. After training he was posted directly to 151 Sqn. Having never flown a Hurricane he was converted there and then. On the 24th August he shot down a He 111and on the 30th in combat with another He 111 he forced landed his damaged Hurricane and to his amazement the bomber he attacked crashed in the adjoining field. The following day he attacked a JUG 88 and was hit by return fire and had to bail out. Being burnt he was admitted to Southend Hospital. After convalescence he rejoined the Squadron in 
December 1940.

Wing Commander Paul Farnes DFM
Joined the RAF VR in April 1938. After initial training and spending 6 months with the RAF he converted to Hurricanes. On the 14th September 1939 he joined 501 Sqn. The Squadron flew to France on the 10th May 1940 where he achieved several victories. Being withdrawn from France the Squadron regrouped and moved to Gravesend on the 26th July. During the next three months he fought with distinction in the Battle of Britain scoring more victories. He was awarded the DFM on the 22nd October 1940. November 1940 he was posted to 57 OTU.
He final tally was 8 victories with many damaged.

Leading Signalman Herbert Flower
Joining the RAF in 1937 as a boy entrant (wireless operator). Later training as an Air Gunner, and joining 248 Sqn. in late July 1940, he completed 126 sorties with coastal command off the shores of Scotland.

Wing Commander Bob Foster DFC AE
On the 1st May 1939 he joined the RAFVR. On 2nd September he was called up for full time service, after initial training he was sent to Sutton Bridge to convert to Hurricanes. Commissioned on the 9th June he was then posted to 605 Sqn. on the 6th July. In combat with a Bf109 on 27th September his Hurricane was badly damaged, which he force landed at Gatwick, the following day he damaged a Ju88. Also seeing intense combat throughout October for which he clamed several victories. September 1941 he was posted to 55 OTU.  
His final score was 6 victories.

Air Chief Marshal Sir Christopher Foxley-Norris GCB DSO OBE FRSA
Whilst at Trinity College, Oxford, he joined the university Air Squadron. In December 1938 he was commissioned into the RAFVR..  September 1939 he was called up for service and after training he converted to Hurricanes.  Joining 3 Sqn. on the 27th September 1940, he  moved to 619 Sqn. on the 19th November. The  memorial wall at Capel Le Ferne is named in his honour.

Wing Commander John Freeborn DFC*
Commissioned in the RAF in March 1938, after initial training and converting to Spitfires he was posted to 74 Sqn. on the 29th October. On the 21st May 1940 he claimed his first victory over the beaches of Dunkirk, scoring several more in quick succession. During the Battle of Britain he had multiple victories for this he was awarded the DFC on the13th August 1940. He was made a Flight Commander on the 28th.. Scoring several more victories before being posted to 57 OTU on the 6th June 1941.

 Flight  Lieutenant Trevor Gray
Joining the RAFVR in 1938, he was called up for full time service at the outbreak of war. After training he was posted to 64 Sqn. on the 16th September 1940 flying Spitfires. Serving with the Squadron until April 1941.

Flight Lieutenant Bill Green
Joining 501 Sqn. Aux AF at Bristol in December 1939 as a AC2 fitter. Learning to fly with the Squadron he was called up for service in 1939. After training he rejoined 501 and taught himself to fly the Hurricane, being made operational on the 20th August. Seeing action with the squadron throughout September and October and was posted to 504 Sqn. in November 1940.

Flight Lieutenant Peter Hairs MBE
Joined the RAFVR in October 1937, on completing his training he converted to Hurricanes being posted to 501 Sqn on 24th January 1940. He went with the Squadron to France on the 10th May and on the 15th he shared with the destruction of a DO17. On returning to the UK he fought with distinction throughout the Battle of Britain and destroyed a Bf 109 of September 5th. He was posted to 15 FTS on the 13th October 1940.

Sergeant Bill Hodds
Joining the RAF in November 1939. Posted to 25 Sqn, Flying for a very short time before being posted to Burma on ground radars where he spent the rest of the war.

Flight Lieutenant Bob Hughes DFC AE
In the Spring of 1939 he joined the RAFVR enlisting in the RAF on 12th May 1939. On 17th August 1940 he joined 23 Sqn. as an Air Gunner flying in Blenheims. When the Squadron converted to Havocs on the 16th November he was posted to 9 Sqn. Bomber Command.

Squadron Leader Tony Iveson DFC AE
Joined with RAFVR in September 1938, being called up for full service on the 1st September 1939. On completion of training and converting to Spitfires he was posted to 616 Sqn. at Kenley at the beginning of September 1940. On the 16th he ditched in the North sea after running out of fuel chasing a JU 88. He was lucky enough to be picked up by a MTB and taken to Yarmouth. He was posted to 92 Sqn. on the 11th October.

Air Vice Marshal Johnnie Johnson CB CBE DSO** DFC*
Joined the RAFVR in July 1939,he was called up for service at the outbreak of war. After initial training and converting to Spitfires in August 1940 joining 19 Sqn. at the end of the month, then posted to 616 Sqn.on the 5th September. Only flying one or two operational sorties. He went into hospital for surgery and did not rejoin the Squadron until December 1940.
His final tally was 37 destroyed which made him the leading ace in the European theatre.

Flight Lieutenant Richard Jones
Joined the RAFVR in July 1938 and was called up for active service on September 1st, converting to Spitfires he joined 64 Sqn. in early July and moved to 19 Sqn at Fowlmere on the 12th September flying as part of the Big Wing. In November he rejoined 64 Sqn. at Hornchurch.

Wing Commander Terrance Kane
Joining the RAF on a short service commission in July 1938, during training he was injured and was admitted to hospital. On completion of training he converted to Spitfires and joined 234 Sqn. at St. Eval. on the 22nd September 1940. The very next day he was bounced by 109’s and shot down into the Channel where he was picked up by Germans and spent the rest of the war as a POW.

Squadron Leader Bob Kings
Joined the RAFVR in July 1938 and called up on September 1st  After training and converting to Hurricanes he was posted to 238 Sqn. on the 31st August 1940. He was shot down by a Bf 109 in combat over the Isle of Wight, bailed out unhurt. Four days later he collided with another Hurricane of 238 Sqn.He was injured due to a heavy landing because of a damaged parachute and was admitted to hospital. He stayed with the Squadron until the 19th June 1941.

Flight Lieutenant Keith Lawrence DFC
In February 1938 he enrolled in the civil reserve of pilots in New Zealand, in June was granted a short service commission in the RAF, leaving for the UK on February 1st 1939. After training he was posted to 234Sqn. flying Blenheims but the Squadron started to receive Spitfires in March 1940. Seeing intense combat through July and August with several victories before being posted to 603 Sqn. at Hornchurch on the 15th September. On the 8th October he was posted to the newly formed 421 Flight which was forming at Hawkinge, on the 26th November he was shot down by Bf 109’s, badly injured and landing in the Channel he was picked up by a mine-sweeper and was taken to Ramsgate.

Squadron Leader Arthur Leigh DFC DFM
Joined the RAFVR in June 1939 and was called up for service at the outbreak of war. On completion of training and converting to Spitfires he was posted to 64 Sqn. at Leconfield, and moving to Biggin Hill to join 72 Sqn. on October11th 1940. His final score was 4 destroyed.

Flight Lieutenant Robin Lucas
Joining the RAF on a short service commission in July 1939, with training completed he was posted to 141 Sqn. flying Defiants at Prestwick on the August 19th 1940. Coming down to 11 group flying from Biggin Hill as the night defence of London, he stayed with the Squadron until June 17th 1941.

Wing Commander Tom Neil DFC* AFC AE
Joining the RAFVR in October 1938, he was called up for full-time service on the 2nd September. After initial training he was commissioned and joined249 Sqn. in May 1940 flying Hurricanes. On the 7th September he claimed a Bf 109, He 111 on the 11th two Bf 109 on the 15th  and a DO 17. On the 27th he destroyed a Bf 110 and a JU 88and also a Bf 110 probable destroyed and sharing a JU 88. In October he shared a DO 17 on the 25th and destroyed a BF 109 on the 27th. On the 7th November he also destroyed a JU 87 and two BF 109’s, on this same day he collided with another Hurricane bailing out unhurt. For these victories he was awarded a DFC on the 8th October 1940 and a bar on the 26th November 1940.

Squadron Leader Doug Nicholls DFC
Joining the RAFVR in September 1939 and called up for full time service at the outbreak of war. After initial training he converted to Hurricanes in June 1940. Briefly being posted to 85 and 242 Sqn's. He was then sent to join 151 Sqn. at Digby. Sharing the destruction of a JU88 on the 30th September in which his Hurricane was severely damaged by return fire. He stayed with the Squadron until August 1941 when he was posted to 258 Squadron.

Wing Commander Peter Olver DFC
March 1938 he joined the RAFVR at Derby and was called up for full time service on September 1st 1939. After 10 hour training he converted to Spitfires before joining 611 Sqn. on September 29th 1940.Moving to 603 Sqn. at Hornchurch on October 24th.The very next day on his first operational sortie he was shot down by Bf109’s, and was slightly wounded. He finished the war as an Ace with 6 victories.

Wing Commander Geoffrey Page DSO OBE DFC
Called up for full-time service in September 1939, after training he was posted to 66 Sqn. but on the 6th June 1940 he moved to 56 Sqn. flying Hurricanes. During the air battles of July he had several victories. He was shot down on the 12th August, bailing out, badly burnt he was rescued by the Margate lifeboat. He underwent plastic surgery at the Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead and was a founder member of the Guinea pig club. His final victory tally was 15 destroyed.

Squadron Leader Tony Pickering AE
In April 1939 he joined the RAFVR and began weekend flying. Called up for full time service on the 1st September1939. After training he was posted to 32 Sqn. at Biggin Hill with two other newly trained pilots. With no experience in flying Hurricanes the C/O sent them to 6 OTU. On the 25th August they rejoined 32 Sqn. Two days later the Squadron was posted for rest where Pickering and the two other pilots were sent to 501 Sqn. at Gravesend. On the 11th September he was shot down by a Bf109 on the 29th October he claimed a Bf109 destroyed. In December he was posted to 601 Sqn.

Group Captain Herbert Pinfold
Joined the RAF on a short service commission in September 1934. He was posted to 6 Sqn in Egypt in 1935. Posted back to the UK in 1936 he joined 64 and then 502 Sqn. Being an instructor and taking a fresher course he converted to Hurricanes. Taking command of 56 Sqn. on the 25th August remaining with the Squadron until January 1941.

Wing Commander Jack Rose GMC MBE DFC
He joined the RAF on a short service commission in October 1938. After training and converting to Hurricanes he joined 3 Sqn. at Biggin Hill. The Squadron was then posted to France where it was attached to 63 Wing, seeing  action for 10 days in May 1940 where he destroyed 3 enemy aircraft. The Squadron was withdrawn from France and returned to the UK. He was the posted to 232 Sqn. before joining 32 Sqn. on the 22nd August. On the 25th he was shot down over the Channel by Bf 109’s bailing out he was rescued from the sea.

Squadron Leader Nigel Rose AE
In March 1939 joined the RAFVR. After initial training and converting to Spitfires he joined 602 Sqn. at Drem on the 18th June.They were posted to Westhampnett   where he claimed a BF 110 destroyed on the 25th August and another on the 7th September. He was injured on the 9th September and did not return to  operations until the 7th October claiming a BF 109 destroyed on 29th. He stayed with the Squadron until the 2nd September 1941.

Wing Commander Richard Summers  OBE Ostj AFM
 Joining the RAF in April 1939 as a direct-entry airman u/t Observer. On the  4th December he was posted to 242 Sqn. which were then equipped with Blenheims.  Then on April 16th 1940 he was posted to 219 Sqn. at Catterick, where he stayed  operational with the Squadron until 28th September.

Flight Lieutenant Alex Thom DFC
Joined the RAFVR on the 24th June 1939 as an airman u/t pilot and began weekend flying. Called up for full time service at the outbreak of war. After initial training was posted to 79 Sqn. flying Hurricanes at Pembury on the 6th October 1940. He then joined 87 Sqn. on the 31st of that month. He was credited with 3 destroyed and 1 probable.

Wing Commander George Unwin DSO DFM*
Joined the RAF in 1929 as an apprentice clerk, applied for pilot training on the 25th November 1935. On completion of training was posted to 19 Sqn. at Duxford, being one of the first to fly the Spitfire with an RAF Squadron. Over Dunkirk on the 27th May 1940 he destroyed HS 126, followed over the next few days with another three victories. During the Battle of Britain he claimed a BF 110 on the 16 August another on the 7th September and two BF 109 on the 11th, incredibly destroyed three more BF 109’s on the 15th September over London and on the 18th an BF 110 and on the 27th a BF 109 for this he was awarded the DFM on 1st October 1940.
His final victories were 14 confirmed destroyed.

Flight Lieutenant William Walker AE
Joined the RAF VR on 2nd September 1938 and flew his first solo on the 28th. Called up for full time service on the 1st September 1939. On completion of training and converting to Spitfires he was posted to 616 Sqn. Seeing action with the Squadron during July until the 26th August when he was shot down. Bailing out he was wounded in the foot, he was rescued by the Royal Navy and admitted to Ramsgate Hospital. After convalescence he rejoined the 
Squadron on the 1st May 1941.

Squadron Leader Geoffrey Wellum DFC
Joined the RAF on a short service commission in August 1939. When training was completed and converting to Spitfires he was posted to 92 Sqn. on the 21st May 1940. In June the Squadron was based at Pembury and then moved to the famed Biggin Hill base in September, flying throughout the Battle of Britain with 92 Sqn with a victory on the 11th September and the destruction of a Ju88 on the 27th. In August 1941 he was posted to 52 OTU as an instructor.


THE EDITIONS

Commemorating the 70th Anniversary 
of the Battle of Britain:
The Battle of Britain Memorial Trust 
OFFICIAL LIMITED EDITION PRINT

The Battle of Britain Memorial Trust limited edition is published in an edition limited to 500 numbered copies only. The print measures 725mm x 505mm overall with an image size of 610mm x 354mm
The print is reproduced on acid free 300 gfm paralux paper with light resistance inks.
Each edition carries the original signatures of up to 50 Battle of Britain aircrew. 

THE ACES EDITION
The Aces edition is limited to 195 copies worldwide signed by: 
Group Captain Billy Drake DSO DFC
Wing Commander Paul Farnes DFM
Wing Commander Bob Foster DFC AE
Wing Commander John Freeborn DFC*
Flight Lieutenant Keith Lawrence DFC
Wing Commander Tom Neil DFC* AFC AE


THE BATTLE OF BRITAIN EDITION
This edition is limited to 200 copies worldwide signed by the above 
and the list below making a total of 25 Battle of Britain aircrew signatures:
Squadron Leader Percy Beake DFC
Pilot Officer Norman Brown
Squadron Leader Joe Chamberlain
Flight Lieutenant Len Davies
Wing Commander Tim Elkington
Air Commodore John Ellacombe CB DFC*
Leading Signalman Herbert Flower
Flight Lieutenant Trevor Gray
Flight Lieutenant Bill Green
Flight Lieutenant Peter Hairs MBE
Sergeant Bill Hodds
Flight Lieutenant Bob Hughes DFC AE
Squadron Leader Tony Iveson DFC AE
Group Captain Herbert Pinfold
Squadron Leader Nigel Rose AE
Wing Commander Jack Rose GMC MBE DFC
Wing Commander Richard Summers OBE Ostj AFM
Flight Lieutenant Alex Thom DFC
Squadron Leader Doug Nicholls DFC


THE BATTLE OF BRITAIN ARTIST PROOF EDITION
This is limited to 50 copies worldwide includes the signatures already listed
and the following, making a total of 30 Battle of Britain signatures
Squadron Leader Peter Brown AFC
Flight Lieutenant Richard Jones 
Wing Commander Terrance Kane 
Flight Lieutenant Robin Lucas
Wing Commander Peter Olver DFC

LOW INVENTORY


THE ACES EDITION
Limited edition of 195 worldwide with 6 signatures
£150

THE BATTLE OF BRITAIN EDITION
Limited edition of 200 worldwide with 25 signatures 
£325

THE BATTLE OF BRITAIN ARTIST PROOF EDITION
Limited edition of 50 worldwide with 30 signatures
£375 - LOW INVENTORY

ARTIST SIGNED EDITION
Limited to 150 worldwide
£95


We would like to thank the following for their invaluable support:
The many Battle of Britain veterans who so willingly and freely gave of their time, 
Group Captain Patrick and Mrs Janet Tootal for overseeing this project
on behalf of the Battle of Britain Memorial Trust, 
Mr. David Phelps for kindly sponsoring the original painting, Rare Reproductions for producing this brochure, 
Flypast Magazine for their help in promoting this print and Cambridge Marquees for subsidising our facilities at Duxford Air Show.

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